You are here

Our strategy

In September 2020 we set out our updated strategy for the next five years.

As the actuarial profession evolves, we want to ensure that the IFoA remains at the forefront of the curve: broadening our relevance, helping to shape the profession’s future, and attracting new talent, while still ensuring that the profession remains a rewarding one for existing members.

Our strategy is ambitious, robust and well-thought through, and will stand us in good stead to meet the challenges of the next five years.

Building on our strategy set out in 2016 we have sharpened our focus on three key priorities:

  • Ensuring a deep understanding of what is important to our current and future members
  • Supporting IFoA actuaries in adapting to change in existing sectors as well as moving into wider fields, specifically through a focus on developing skills and sectoral participation
  • Strengthening partnerships with a variety of stakeholders to enhance the reputation and influence of the profession worldwide.

Read more about our plans for the next five years in our Strategy 2020–2024.

Related documents

You might also like

Contact Details

Jo Jones, Deputy Chief of Staff provides the Secretariat to the Executive Leadership Team

jo.jones@actuaries.org.uk

I will try to respond to email queries within five working days.

Filter or search events

Start date
E.g., 24/02/2021
End date
E.g., 24/02/2021

Events calendar

  • Sub-Saharan Africa Town Hall

    26 February 2021

    Spaces available

    IFoA Immediate Past President John Taylor would like to invite you to the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries’ (IFoA) virtual SSA Town Hall 2021, hosted by John Taylor with IFoA Council Members Mukami Njeru, Prosper Matiashe and IFoA Chief Executive, Stephen Mann.

  • MENAP Town Hall

    2 March 2021

    Spaces available

    IFoA Immediate Past President John Taylor would like to invite you to the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries’ (IFoA) virtual Middle East, North Africa and Pakistan (MENAP) Town Hall 2021, hosted by John Taylor and IFoA Chief Executive, Stephen Mann. 

  • Spaces available

    COVID-19 has seen a marked increase in mental health issues. We all have mental health and poor mental health has serious consequences for individuals and our workplaces, with it costing UK businesses £33-42 billion annually.

  • The price is righter

    16 March 2021

    Spaces available

    This webinar provides an overview of the state of the UK protection market, and how different insurers are using different levels of sophistication to price (such as using customer demand models). It considers how insurers have implemented these sophisticated pricing techniques, and the practical challenges they have faced.

  • Spaces available

    This discussion will revolve around the latest industry developments including and introduction to Part VII transfers and Schemes of Arrangement (process, parties involved and recent events), insights and lessons from recent with-profits transactions and restructurings (including Equitable Life and Pru-Rothesay), how firms can apply these learnings to future arrangements, and the outlook for future with-profits transactions and restructurings (including the impacts of Covid-19 and Brexit)

     

  • Spaces available

    What is stewardship and how has the landscape changed under the 2020 UK Stewardship Code?

    • How does effective stewardship create long term value for beneficiaries?
    • What roles do asset owners and asset managers play in active stewardship?
    • A practical approach to stewardship reporting
  • Spaces available

    Income drawdown products offer an investment strategy to generate an income in retirement.  However, for those needing to decumulate their capital to provide a sufficient income in retirement, sequencing risk is high.  This is the risk that poor returns are experienced when capital is highest (in the first part of the decumulation phase) and good returns when capital is lowest (in the last part).   It is very difficult to recover from this risk, if it is realised.  This means that income drawdown products are not very resilient for those needing to decumulate their capital.