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In remembrance: members who served and died in World War II, 1939-1945

On the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, we remember those members who died in service, in action or as prisoners of war

Other members of their generation served too among fellow men and women of the Allied countries, or in special operations, then returned after the war to work as actuaries, their wartime contribution being recorded in their later obituaries.

Members of the Faculty of Actuaries

A generic image of Member of Faculty of Actuaries

Their names are commemorated on a memorial board also honouring those members who fell in both World War I and World War II (see Transactions of the Faculty of Actuaries (1951-1953) 21: 405.)

Frederick James Bowles. Flight Sergeant, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.  Died, 21 April 1943. Student of Faculty.

James Douglas Cameron. Flight Sergeant, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.  Died, 9 May 1942. Student of Faculty.

Hedley Alan Francis Chilvers. Corporal, Transvaal Scottish Regiment, South Africa. Died, 22 November 1941. Student of Faculty.

Eric Spence Fraser. Sub-Lieutenant, South African Naval Forces. Died, 6 October1942. Student of Faculty.

William Alexander Gregg. Second Lieutenant, Home Guard. Died, 23 March 1943. Fellow of Faculty.

Calum Martin McIntyre. Second Lieutenant, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Died, 10 December 1940. Student of Faculty.

Hugh Grant Stewart McLauchlan. Leading Airman, Royal Navy. Died, 17 January 1941. Student of Faculty.

Charles Pearson Robertson. Sergeant, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died, 1 May1941. Student of Faculty.

Brian Alexander Percy Todd. Lieutenant, Royal Scots. Died, 3 April 1943. Student of Faculty.

Denys Hull Todd. Flight Sergeant, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 3rd Squadron. Died, 17 July 1941. Fellow of Faculty.

George Bow Watters. Sergeant Pilot, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 30 September 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA (1943) 71: 339). Fellow of Faculty, Associate of Institute.

Walter John Webb. Captain, South African Air Force. Died, 4 November 1942. Student of Faculty.

John Jeffrey Young. Leading Aircraftman, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died, 7 November 1944. Student of Faculty

“Ad finem fidelis”

Members of the Institute of Actuaries

the Institute of Actuaries War Memorial plaque imageTheir names are commemorated on the Institute of Actuaries War Memorial plaque at Staple Inn Hall's Council chamber next to that for members who fell in World War I.
See Journal of the Institute of Actuaries (1922) 53: 99-104.

John Albert Stokes Banting. Pilot Officer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Officially presumed killed on active service, April 1942. (JIA (1943) 71: 459; Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63). Associate of Institute.

Christopher Edward Thomas Bartram.  Pilot Officer, Royal Australian Air Force. Officially presumed killed on active service, 31 July 1942. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Fellow of Institute.

Eric Austin Bergan. Died in an accident while a member of the Australian Defence Forces, 18 January 1946. (JIA (1946) 72: 538; Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236). Student of Institute.

William Graeme Bone. 2nd Lieutenant, King's Own Royal Regiment. Killed while on service with the Middle East Force, July 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA (1943) 71: 339). Student of Institute.

Noel Cecil Bray. Killed while serving with a Bomb Disposal Unit of the Royal Engineers, 25 January 1942. (Institute Yearbook 1942-1943: 128; JIA (1943) 71: 339). Student of Institute.

Stanton Herman Bush. 2nd Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, Royal Armoured Corps. Killed in action in Germany, 19 April 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 154; JIA (1946) 72: 290). Student of Institute.

Maurice Robert Clark. Reported as having lost his life during air operations, 24 March 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 154; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Howard Brian Currall.  Pilot Officer, Royal Air Force. Missing, presumed killed while on U-Boat patrol, 31 March 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 154; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Harold Percy Dowsett. Died whilst a Prisoner of War, 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Kenneth Noel Drummond. Flight Lieutenant, Royal Australian Air Force. Died of illness while on active service, September 1944. (Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Stanley James Elphick. Flying Officer, Royal Air Force. Presumed killed as a result of air operations, 14 July 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1947-1948: 218). Student of Institute.

Paul Gilder. Lieutenant, Royal Artillery. Killed in action, September 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

William Elder Gillett. Killed by enemy action, 2 October 1940. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA (1943) 71: 184). Fellow of Institute.

Ralph Bernard Gough. Telegraphist, H.M.S. 'Exmouth'. Lost at sea, January 1940. (Institute Yearbook 1940-1941: 134; JIA (1939) 70: 436). Student of Institute.

Arnold Boynton Hall. Telegraphist, H.M.S. 'Exmouth'. Lost at sea,. (Institute Yearbook 1940-1941: 134; JIA (1939) 70: 436). Student of Institute.

John Denton Hargreaves. Gunner, Royal Air Force. Killed in air crash in France, 4 April 1940. (Institute Yearbook 1940-1941: 134; JIA (1943) 71: 184). Probationer of Institute.

Gordon Francis Jones. Pilot Officer, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, April 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1944-1945: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Associate of Institute.

Leonard Thomas Kiff. Sergeant Glider Pilot, Army Air Corps. Killed in action at Arnhem, 24 September 1944. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 155; JIA (1946) 72: 290). Student of Institute.

Anthony Francis Nielsen Ladefoged. Killed while serving with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, December 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1942-1943: 128; JIA (1943) 71: 339). Student of Institute.

Bruce Harry Laxton. Died whilst on duty with the Home Guard, February 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

David Roland Lee. Died on active service in Egypt while serving with the Royal Air Force, 20 August 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 155; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

John Colin Reid MacCallum. Killed on active service with Royal Air Force over Holland, February 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

John Richard Martin. Sergeant Officer, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 27 April 1942. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

John Haycroft Meyer. Killed while serving with the Fleet Air Arm, 24 October 1940. (JIA (1943) 71: 339). Student of Institute.

Charles Lionel Moody. Pilot Officer, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 7 October 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1944-1945: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

Francis William Morrell. Presumed killed while serving with the Royal Air Force, 4 July 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1944-1945: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

Arnold George Noble. Sergeant, Australian Imperial Forces. Died as a Prisoner of War, 15 January 1944. (JIA (1947) 73: 163; Institute Yearbook 1947-1948: 218). Student of Institute.

James Parkes. Died as a result of enemy action while serving with the Royal Air Force, Sicily, August 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

Eric Ernest Craddock Phillips. Sergeant Observer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Killed, 3 March 1941. JIA (1943) 71: 339). Student of Institute.

Kenneth Ernest Platt. Pilot Officer, Royal Air Force. Killed in action in Hong Kong, 18 April 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1942-1943: 128; JIA (1943) 71: 459). Student of Institute.

Baron Edmond Platts. 2nd Lieutenant, R.A. Killed on active service, 19 December 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236). Student of Institute.

John Poyer-Williams. Lieutenant, Wiltshire Regiment. Killed in action, 10 July 1944. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 155). Student of Institute.

Frank William Price. Flight Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. Missing, presumed killed on flying operations, 12 February 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 155). Student of Institute.

Gerald Darley Redfern. Lieutenant, The Green Howards. Killed in action, March 1944. (Institute Yearbook 1944-1945: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

Ernest George Redman. Flying Officer, Royal Air Force. Missing after air raid in Germany, presumed killed, 4 July 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1945-1946: 155; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Stuart Kennedy Scott. Killed whilst serving with the Royal Australian Air Force, 26 January 1943. (Institute Yearbook 1943-1944: 63; JIA (1946) 72: 131). Student of Institute.

Athol Claud Kennedy Smith. Killed while serving with the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserves, 7 October 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA 71 (1946): 339). Student of Institute.

Neale McKissock Thewlis. Flying Officer, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 29 January 1945. (Institute Yearbook 1946-1947: 236; JIA (1946) 72: 538). Student of Institute.

Arthur Frank Wainwright. Killed by enemy action, 26 October 1940. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA (1943) 71: 184). Student of Institute.

George Bow Watters. Sergeant Pilot, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 30 September 1941. (Institute Yearbook 1941-1942: 124; JIA (1943) 71: 339). Associate of Institute, Fellow of Faculty.

David Maitland Watts. Flight Sergeant, Royal Australian Air Force. Officially presumed killed on active service, 13 August 1942. (Institute Yearbook 1947-1948: 218; JIA (1947) 73: 163). Student of Institute.

Peter Reginald Wright. Sergeant Pilot, Royal Air Force. Killed on active service, 4 May 1942. (Institute Yearbook 1942-1943: 128; JIA (1943) 71: 459). Student of Institute.

 “We have them in honour”

Sources:

  • Obituaries: reports in Institute of Actuaries Yearbooks and Journal of the Institute of Actuaries:
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1940-1941: 134.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1941-1942: 124.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1942-1943: 128.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1943-1944: 63.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1944-1945: 63.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1945-1946: 155.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1946-1947: 236.
    • Institute of Actuaries Yearbook 1947-1948: 218.
    • JIA 70 (1939): 436.
    • JIA 71 (1943): 339, 459.
    • JIA 72 (1946): 131, 538.
    • JIA (1947) 73: 163.
  • The Faculty's War Memorial [for members serving in World Wars I, 1914-1918 and II, 1939-1945]. Transactions of the Faculty of Actuaries (1951-1953) 21: 405.
  • R.C. Simmonds (1948). The Institute of Actuaries 1848-1948: an account of the Institute of Actuaries during its first one hundred years.
  • A.R. Davidson (1956). The history of the Faculty of Actuaries in Scotland 1856-1956.

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